7 South Carolina Towns People Are Fleeing As Soon As Possible

South Carolina is a state with a rich history, a diverse culture, and a beautiful landscape. However, not all of its towns are thriving or appealing to residents. Some towns are facing population decline, economic hardship, or environmental challenges that make them less desirable places to live. Here are seven South Carolina towns that people are fleeing as soon as possible, according to the latest census data.

Allendale

Allendale is the county seat of Allendale County, which has the lowest population and the highest poverty rate in the state. The town has lost 33.9% of its population since 2000, and 16.7% since 2010. The town suffers from a lack of jobs, education, and health care, and has a high crime rate. Allendale is one of the most economically distressed communities in the nation, according to a report by the Economic Innovation Group.

Bamberg

Bamberg is the county seat of Bamberg County, which is also among the poorest and most depopulated counties in the state. The town has lost 16.7% of its population since 2010, and 23.6% since 2000. The town has a low median income, a high unemployment rate, and a low educational attainment. Bamberg is also vulnerable to natural disasters, such as floods and hurricanes, that damage its infrastructure and economy.

Lee

Lee is a town in Lee County, which is another county with a high poverty rate and a low population growth. The town has lost 14% of its population since 2010, and 20.8% since 2000. The town has a low median income, a high poverty rate, and a low educational attainment. Lee is also affected by environmental issues, such as poor air quality and water contamination, that pose health risks to its residents.

Dillon

Dillon is the county seat of Dillon County, which is also a county with a high poverty rate and a low population growth. The town has lost 11.1% of its population since 2010, and 15.4% since 2000. The town has a low median income, a high poverty rate, and a low educational attainment. Dillon is also known for its dilapidated public schools, which have been the subject of a long-running lawsuit over inadequate funding and facilities.

Marion

Marion is the county seat of Marion County, which is also a county with a high poverty rate and a low population growth. The town has lost 10.6% of its population since 2010, and 16.9% since 2000. The town has a low median income, a high poverty rate, and a low educational attainment. Marion is also prone to flooding, especially after Hurricane Florence in 2018, which caused severe damage and displacement.

Mullins

Mullins is a town in Marion County, which is also a county with a high poverty rate and a low population growth. The town has lost 10.3% of its population since 2010, and 18.6% since 2000. The town has a low median income, a high poverty rate, and a low educational attainment. Mullins is also affected by the decline of the tobacco industry, which was once its main source of income and employment.

Union

Union is the county seat of Union County, which is also a county with a high poverty rate and a low population growth. The town has lost 9.6% of its population since 2010, and 15.8% since 2000. The town has a low median income, a high poverty rate, and a low educational attainment. Union is also impacted by the loss of manufacturing jobs, which have been outsourced or automated over the years.

Conclusion

These seven towns are examples of the challenges that some rural and small-town communities face in South Carolina and across the nation. They are struggling to retain and attract residents, to provide adequate services and opportunities, and to cope with changing economic and environmental conditions. While some towns may have some potential for revitalization or resilience, others may face further decline or abandonment. These towns reflect the need for more attention and investment from the state and federal governments, as well as from the private and nonprofit sectors, to address the issues of rural and small-town America.

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