People Are Leaving Seven Wyoming Towns as Quickly as Possible

Wyoming is a state known for its natural beauty, low population density, and rich history. However, not all of its towns are thriving in the modern era. In fact, some of them are facing severe decline and depopulation, as residents seek better opportunities elsewhere. In this article, we will explore seven Wyoming towns that are losing people as quickly as possible, and the reasons behind their exodus.

Lost Springs

Lost Springs is a town in Converse County, Wyoming, with a population of only four people, according to the 2020 census. It was once a bustling railroad town, with a hotel, a store, and a post office. However, after the railroad was abandoned, most of the residents moved away. The town has been struggling to survive ever since, and has been featured in several media outlets as one of the smallest towns in America.

Jeffrey City

Jeffrey City is a town in Fremont County, Wyoming, with a population of 58 people, according to the 2020 census. It was founded in 1957 as a uranium mining town, and reached a peak population of over 4,000 people in the 1970s. However, after the uranium market collapsed in the 1980s, the town went into a rapid decline. Most of the businesses closed, and many of the buildings were abandoned. Today, Jeffrey City is a ghost town, with only a few residents remaining.

Kirby

Kirby is a town in Hot Springs County, Wyoming, with a population of 92 people, according to the 2020 census. It was established in 1906 as a ranching community, and later became a hub for oil and gas production. However, in recent years, the town has suffered from a lack of economic development and job opportunities. Many of the younger residents have left the town in search of a better future. The town’s main attraction is the Wyoming Whiskey distillery, which opened in 2009.

Van Tassell

Van Tassell is a town in Niobrara County, Wyoming, with a population of 15 people, according to the 2020 census. It was founded in 1915 as a railroad town, and named after a local rancher. The town was once a lively place, with a school, a church, a store, and a saloon. However, after the railroad was discontinued, the town began to decline. The school closed in 1962, and the church in 1974. Today, Van Tassell is a quiet and isolated place, with few amenities and services.

Hartville

Hartville is a town in Platte County, Wyoming, with a population of 62 people, according to the 2020 census. It is the oldest incorporated town in Wyoming, dating back to 1884. It was a mining town, with rich deposits of copper, iron, and gold. The town prospered until the 1920s, when the mines started to run out of ore. The town’s population declined steadily over the decades, as many of the residents moved away. The town’s historic buildings, such as the Hartville Museum and the Sunrise Mine, are now tourist attractions.

Riverside

Riverside is a town in Carbon County, Wyoming, with a population of 52 people, according to the 2020 census. It is located near the confluence of the Encampment and North Platte rivers, and was a popular fishing and hunting spot for Native Americans and early settlers. The town was founded in 1902, and grew as a logging and ranching center. However, the town’s economy declined in the 20th century, as the timber industry and agriculture faced competition and challenges. The town’s population has been shrinking ever since, and many of the buildings are vacant or dilapidated.

Yoder

Yoder is a town in Goshen County, Wyoming, with a population of 169 people, according to the 2020 census. It was established in 1900 as a farming community, and named after a local settler. The town was once a prosperous place, with a school, a bank, a hotel, and a newspaper. However, the town’s fortunes changed in the 1930s, when a series of droughts, dust storms, and grasshopper infestations devastated the crops and livestock. The town never recovered from the Great Depression, and many of the residents left for other places. The town’s main source of income is now the Yoder Rodeo, which is held every July.

Conclusion

These seven Wyoming towns are examples of how changing economic and social conditions can affect the fate of small communities. They are also reminders of the history and culture of the state, and the challenges and opportunities that it faces in the present and future. While some of these towns may disappear in the near future, others may find new ways to survive and thrive. Either way, they are part of the unique and diverse landscape of Wyoming.

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